Switching to EWT Soft Water

Switching to EWT Soft Water could save Harrow over £600 a year on their energy bills.
Hard water households in Harrow could save £676 a year on energy bills by installing a water softener in their home, new research published today showed.
People living in Harrow – a predominantly hard water area – are more prone to limescale deposits building up within their heating system which cause blockages in pipework and boilers. This reduces the overall efficiency of a heating and plumbing system, resulting in higher water and energy bills. However, by installing filters and switching to softer water, households can make significant savings on their bills.
Hard water is measured in parts per million (ppm), noting how many particles of hardness are dissolved in the water – with anything over 200ppm considered to be hard water. Research by EWT using the company’s online water hardness test showed that Harrow has some of the hardest water in the Ireland. The company estimates that removing limescale from heating systems in these postcodes could save households £56 a month on their energy bills.
Today’s figures come as Ireland households grapple with ways to save on their household bills amid soaring energy costs.
David Forde, General Manager at EWT, said: “If you are living in a hard water area such as Harrow, one way of offsetting soaring energy bills from increasing further is to install a water softener. Not only can it help to reduce your yearly bills, but it can also improve your home’s fuel efficiency and safeguard from a boiler malfunction and the incurred expense of getting this repaired.”
Switching to softer water could also help Harrow save an additional £50 a month on their shopping bill, according to previous research by EWT. The minerals in hard water make it less effective in producing a lather when using cleaning products, meaning consumers have to use more of a product in order to get the same results gained through using soft water. This £50 monthly saving could be a lifeline to Harrow households as supermarket items continue to rise in price.